Human Resource Management

HRM Guide Updates
HRM Guide publishes articles and news releases about HR surveys, employment law, human resource research, HR books and careers that bridge the gap between theory and practice.

  ; ?>

Learning survey

June 10 2005 - A quarter of British office workers blame their 'David Brent' style bosses for holding back their development, according to recent research conducted for the online learning specialist, SkillSoft. 63% of the 3000 employees surveyed feel they could be doing better in their career. But many workers say they get no support when it comes to training and career development and bosses fail to recognise and nurture their potential.

The survey also found that public service employees get the most encouragement from their managers with 66% saying their employers are happy for them to develop their skills compared to 56% of people working for private companies.

Public sector workers also get more opportunities for on-the-job training - 40% say they get formal training and mentoring. This compares with 31% in private firms who receive the same level of support.

According to Kevin Young, managing director of SkillSoft: "It's evident from this study that a large number of people are not being given the opportunity to live up to their potential at work; particularly in the private sector.

'Just consider the productivity gains that could be achieved if UK businesses stepped up their commitment to developing their employees' skills."

64% of those surveyed said their employer allowed them no time in the working day for their professional development. 89% of employees said that would prefer to be in control of their own learning.

Kevin Young commented: "This is in line with some research we did last year amongst employees already using e-learning, the majority of whom were taking control of their own professional development by accessing online learning in the office before or after work, or at home in the evenings and at weekends.

'The effect on their jobs was evident; nearly everyone interviewed could give practical examples of how they had applied their new knowledge at work."

Other key findings:

  • 53% are already willingly spend their own free time on professional development. But many more employees workers said they would spend their spare time studying if bosses allowed them time to learn in the office as well.
  • 43% of employees felt that they need to spend only 2-4 hours a week on training to achieve their full potential.
  • Asked about the kind of training they needed, 45% said they would like more training in communications and customer relations skills and 50% wanted more management and leadership skills training.
  • 67.5% say they deserved higher pay.
  • Most employees enjoy their work - 43% saying that they got some pleasure from their work and 40% go as far as to say they enjoy their jobs "a lot." A mere 10% said they don't enjoy their job at all.

Human Resource Development: Strategy and Tactics

by Juani Swart, Alan Price, Clare Mann, Steve Brown
  Each chapter in Human Resource Development provides the reader with commentary, activities and review sections in an integrated approach. The action-oriented approach is vital for practicing managers but increasingly for postgraduate and final year undergraduates who have work experience. It is this aspect of the book that fills a gap that currently exists in the market. This text reflects organizational realities and balances and integrates the coverage of individuals, teams and organizational learning.The book is written in a straightforward manner and explains concepts and key issues in a lucid style. The activities are focused and are better suited to encouraging readers to learn.
  More information and prices from:
Amazon.co.uk - British pounds
Amazon.com - US dollars
Amazon.ca - Canadian dollars
Amazon.de - Euros
Amazon.fr - Euros





HRM Guide makes minimal use of cookies, including some placed to facilitate features such as Google Search. By continuing to use the site you are agreeing to the use of cookies. Learn more here

HRM Guide Updates
Custom Search
  Contact  HRM Guide Privacy Policy
Copyright © 1997-2017 Alan Price and HRM Guide Network contributors. All rights reserved.